Aaron Farber, Director of Accessibility Auditing

Aaron Farber, Director of Accessibility Auditing, Be Accessible Inc.

For visually impaired users that don’t have the benefit of visual cues, navigating a site and finding the information they want takes longer. An average user of your website might click a link and go to a new webpage. They scan that page and find it isn’t what they were looking for and so they go back to the previous webpage – all in a matter of seconds. For screen reader users, this hiccup takes minutes.

Thinking about accessibility realizes benefits for all users. When the process to order food delivery or book an appointment, is intuitive, more people will use and return to your site to give you their business. This means more conversions.

Be Accessible provides webinars, half day and full day sessions for accessibility training for audiences, technical and non-technical. The following video is a brief example of what we may cover:

Accessibility is dynamic, not brittle. It’s about expecting user behavior and providing clear, intuitive navigation on your website.

We know code. We know design. Our developers find the most meaningful issues on your site and prioritize them in terms of cost to fix and impact to the general user base.

Now, you can make your website accessible or be sued first, and forced to do it on a shorter, more expensive timeline. Be Accessible believes that integrating accessibility must be a manageable, sustainable process.

Be Accessible provides you with a regular testing policy, a workflow for resolving issues, a point of contact for users to raise accessibility issues, and an accessibility statement, to be publicly posted. Altogether, your business develops an accessibility program that satisfies courts and makes your company part of an Internet that serves everyone.

We’re based in Los Angeles. We love what we do.

Nancy Urquilla

Nancy is a blind Los Angeles native who does website accessibility testing for Be Accessible Inc. in the Glendale, CA office.  

Q: How long have you been visually impaired and using assistive technologies?

A: I have been blind since birth due to congenital Glaucoma. I was first introduced to assistive technology in 2012 when I attended a 9-month program to learn blindness skills.

Q: What a big challenge you face when accessing websites?

A: Many websites display text on pictures and screen readers are unable to capture this information to turn into speech.

Q: What defines an accessible website for you?

A: The most important thing that makes a website accessible is that my screen reader is able to navigate and read all elements found in such website using the keyboard. In addition, one should be able to navigate this website completely independent without the assistance of a sighted person.

Q: What are some websites that you use that are very accessible?

A: My bank’s website is very accessible. I bank with Wells Fargo and I am able to get everything done on that website without ever requiring the assistance of a sighted person to accomplish the tasks at hand.

Q: Can you tell right away if a site is accessible and what do you do if it’s not?

A: Yes, I can definitely tell right away. Sometimes my screen reader will simply announce link or button and nothing else. Other times it will simply announce blank. If it is at all possible, I contact the website developers to let them know about their website being inaccessible.

Q: How has technology made your day-to-day life more convenient?

A: Assistive technology has allowed me to compete in equal grounds with my sighted peers in so many ways. It is because of assistive technology that I am able to have a job and to perform all functions and responsibilities required. I can pretty much do everything a sighted person can, using my computer with the screen reading software and with my iPhone.

Q: Do you feel companies are becoming more inclusive to the visually impaired? 

A: I find that very few companies are making it a point to be inclusive. Unfortunately, more companies don’t seem to think that accessibility is a priority especially if they have one or no individuals who need their services in an alternative format.

Q: Working at Be Accessible, how does it feel to have your feedback incorporated into the design of websites?

A: I feel as if I have accomplished something very important. Not only do I want for all websites to be accessible to work with screen readers for my personal use, but also for our future generations. When I was growing up, I struggled to get my school materials in an accessible format and I would love for that barrier to finally disappear. People with disabilities should have equal access to information just as everyone else.

be accessible

Be Accessible Inc. supports websites that need to engage the broadest circle of people. We believe online services can be open to all and empower those with disabilities. We help organizations meet website accessibility standards that are complex and evolving.

Accessibility laws, such as the ADA and Section 508, increasingly apply to websites, treating them as places of public accommodation–that must be inclusive to those with visual, hearing, and motor disabilities.

More than 1,000 web accessibility lawsuits were filed in 2017.

Be Accessible Inc. provides your company with a 3 Step Solution that doesn’t just give you a list of accessibility errors but a roadmap to fixing website issues and compliance. We’re adept in working with developers or executives, technical or non-technical staff. Moreover, we use a combination of automated tools and our own experienced auditors to inspect your website. We then coordinate a group of visually impaired people to test and navigate your site.

Besides the full audit and recommended fixes, we also provide training to avoid future issues, information on your present legal exposure, and above all, a face-to-face relationship with Be Accessible Inc.

Get ahead of legal risk and broaden the circle that can benefit from your product. We’d like to help.

Kind regards,

David Gevorkian, CEO